Draft Community Strategic Plan now on exhibition

Draft Community Strategic Plan 2017-2027

‘Living and Loving the Tweed’ is the theme of Council’s Draft Community Strategic Plan 2017-2027 which went on public exhibition in early January for community comment.

Click here to access the Draft Community Strategic Plan or for information about making a submission please visit www.tweed.nsw.gov.au/OnExhibition(External link)

The plan aims to document the community’s priorities for the next decade and to define Council’s related goals, strategies, actions and targets.

“We need to balance change to maintain the special characteristics of the Tweed that contribute to the area’s unique identity,” Council’s Director Corporate Services, Liz Collyer said.

“This plan sets out the community’s vision and Council’s commitment for the Tweed for the next 10 years.

“The draft plan has been shaped by many contributions from the community through our shire-wide survey and events with the team from our Community Engagement Network.

“A comprehensive community engagement process over the plan’s exhibition period will provide a variety of ways for people to learn more about the plan and continue the converstaion.”

A final version of the Community Strategic Plan will be presented to Council for adoption in March this year, accompanied by a delivery program which outlines the projects to be undertaken to achieve the plan’s broader visions.

Council warmly welcomes your continued involvement in the Community Strategic Plan discussions. For times/locations of community engagement activities and the related ‘Tweed the Future is Ours’ initiative, please visit:

http://yoursaytweed.com.au/ttfio


‘Living and Loving the Tweed’ is the theme of Council’s Draft Community Strategic Plan 2017-2027 which went on public exhibition in early January for community comment.

Click here to access the Draft Community Strategic Plan or for information about making a submission please visit www.tweed.nsw.gov.au/OnExhibition(External link)

The plan aims to document the community’s priorities for the next decade and to define Council’s related goals, strategies, actions and targets.

“We need to balance change to maintain the special characteristics of the Tweed that contribute to the area’s unique identity,” Council’s Director Corporate Services, Liz Collyer said.

“This plan sets out the community’s vision and Council’s commitment for the Tweed for the next 10 years.

“The draft plan has been shaped by many contributions from the community through our shire-wide survey and events with the team from our Community Engagement Network.

“A comprehensive community engagement process over the plan’s exhibition period will provide a variety of ways for people to learn more about the plan and continue the converstaion.”

A final version of the Community Strategic Plan will be presented to Council for adoption in March this year, accompanied by a delivery program which outlines the projects to be undertaken to achieve the plan’s broader visions.

Council warmly welcomes your continued involvement in the Community Strategic Plan discussions. For times/locations of community engagement activities and the related ‘Tweed the Future is Ours’ initiative, please visit:

http://yoursaytweed.com.au/ttfio


  • Join the 'Draft Community Strategic Plan' conversation

    about 1 month ago
    Cen_pic_for_survey

    Join the conversation with Council's Community Engagement Network

    Council has added community engagement events into the mix as part of the ongoing conversation about ‘Living and Loving the Tweed’, Council’s Draft Community Strategic Plan 2017-2027.

    The 10-year plan aims to document the community’s priorities for the next decade and to define Council’s related goals, strategies, actions and targets. It went on public exhibition earlier this month.

    To learn more about the plan come and meet the team from Council’s Community Engagement Network at:

    ·24 January - Tweed City Shopping Centre

    ·25 January – Caldera Farmers Market – Murwillumbah

    ... Continue reading

    Join the conversation with Council's Community Engagement Network

    Council has added community engagement events into the mix as part of the ongoing conversation about ‘Living and Loving the Tweed’, Council’s Draft Community Strategic Plan 2017-2027.

    The 10-year plan aims to document the community’s priorities for the next decade and to define Council’s related goals, strategies, actions and targets. It went on public exhibition earlier this month.

    To learn more about the plan come and meet the team from Council’s Community Engagement Network at:

    · 24 January - Tweed City Shopping Centre

    · 25 January – Caldera Farmers Market – Murwillumbah

    · 26 January – Tweed Shire Australia Day event – Twin Towns

    · 2 February – Casuarina Shopping Village

    · 5 February – Pottsville Beach Markets

    · 9 February – Murwillumbah Sunnyside Mall

    · 11 February – Kingscliff Markets

    Click here to access the Draft Community Strategic Plan or for information about making a submission please visit www.tweed.nsw.gov.au/OnExhibition(External link)


  • Draft Community Strategic Plan on public exhibition

    about 1 month ago
    Draft_csp_cover
    Tweed Shire Council invites feedback from all interested stakeholders and members of the community to the Draft Community Strategic Plan 2017/2027 “Living and Loving the Tweed”.

    Click here to view the Draft Community Strategic Plan 2017-2027

    The Draft Plan has been shaped by thousands of survey contributions and conversations with the community.

    Throughout those many conversations the recurring themes for Council were about listening to the community and finding that important balance between supporting a vibrant, prosperous, community life and protecting the environment.

    Tweed Shire Council has a custodial role in initiating, preparing and maintaining the plan on behalf... Continue reading
    Tweed Shire Council invites feedback from all interested stakeholders and members of the community to the Draft Community Strategic Plan 2017/2027 “Living and Loving the Tweed”.

    Click here to view the Draft Community Strategic Plan 2017-2027

    The Draft Plan has been shaped by thousands of survey contributions and conversations with the community.

    Throughout those many conversations the recurring themes for Council were about listening to the community and finding that important balance between supporting a vibrant, prosperous, community life and protecting the environment.

    Tweed Shire Council has a custodial role in initiating, preparing and maintaining the plan on behalf of the Tweed community, but it is not wholly responsible for its implementation. Other partners such as State agencies and community groups will help contribute to deliver the Tweed community’s long-term goals.

    The purpose of the plan is to identify the community’s main priorities and aspirations for the future and plan actions to achieve them. It will inform our four-year Delivery Program and in turn our annual operational plans. For further information on the Draft Community Strategic Plan 2017/2027 and the ‘Tweed the Future is Ours’ initiative please visit yoursaytweed.com.au/ttfio

    Council invites feedback on the draft Plan from all interested stakeholders and members of the community.

    Submissions may be made to tsc@tweed.nsw.gov.au or by post to:

    Draft Community Strategic Plan
    General Manager
    Tweed Shire Council
    PO Box 816
    Murwillumbah, NSW 2484

    The policy will be on exhibition until 25 February 2017 and public submissions must be received by close of business on that day.

    Contact:
    Michael Chorlton , Manager Financial Services
    Phone (02) 6670 2431
    mchorlton@tweed.nsw.gov.au

  • Council wants to know your vision for the Tweed of the future?

    5 months ago
    Wide_town

    A message from the General Manager

    I’m sure most of you would agree that the Tweed is a great place to live. You may not have thought much about it, but the services your local council provides are a big part of the overall quality of life in the Tweed.

    ‘Tweed the Future is Ours’ is one of the most important community engagement and planning projects our council has undertaken – it will help to shape the very nature of the important services we deliver.

    The Community Strategic Plan and related Delivery Program are key milestones as part of the... Continue reading

    A message from the General Manager

    I’m sure most of you would agree that the Tweed is a great place to live. You may not have thought much about it, but the services your local council provides are a big part of the overall quality of life in the Tweed.

    ‘Tweed the Future is Ours’ is one of the most important community engagement and planning projects our council has undertaken – it will help to shape the very nature of the important services we deliver.

    The Community Strategic Plan and related Delivery Program are key milestones as part of the project.

    Council's services include roads, waste collections, community events, cultural activities, community services, recreation and sporting fields and many more.

    Council delivers more than 50 services – that’s a lot. We also manage and maintain a large number of assets, such as roads, footpaths, cycleways, community buildings, swimming pools, civic centres, auditoriums and water treatment plants.

    The NSW Government’s local government reform process “Fit for the Future”, has presented the opportunity to look at what we do, why we do it, how well we do it and at what cost.

    What excites me the most about ‘Tweed the Future is Ours’ is the opportunity for myself and other Council staff to listen to as many Tweed residents as possible during the project, which is expected to take around 18 months. This is a genuine commitment by Council to continue to build relationships and have meaningful conversations with as many locals as we can.

    The good news is Tweed Shire Council is in a strong financial position. We want to maintain this position and find the best balance of providing quality services and the right infrastructure and delivering value for money for the Tweed community into the future.

    I look forward to catching up with you through ‘Tweed the Future is Ours’.

    Troy Green, General Manager, Tweed Shire Council


  • SURVEY CLOSED -- Planning for Council Services

    4 months ago
    Catchment

    Thank you Tweed residents for having your say on the Tweed of tomorrow.

    Council's Service Planning Survey has now closed, almost 2000 Tweed residents took the time to rate Council's services in terms of importance, satisfaction and their priorities as well as providing their vision for the Tweed of the future.

    Council will use the results to help plan to deliver future services and to provide input into important planning documents such as the Community Strategic Plan.

    The draft of the Community Strategic Plan will be on display in the New Year for community members to provide further feedback on.

    ... Continue reading

    Thank you Tweed residents for having your say on the Tweed of tomorrow.

    Council's Service Planning Survey has now closed, almost 2000 Tweed residents took the time to rate Council's services in terms of importance, satisfaction and their priorities as well as providing their vision for the Tweed of the future.

    Council will use the results to help plan to deliver future services and to provide input into important planning documents such as the Community Strategic Plan.

    The draft of the Community Strategic Plan will be on display in the New Year for community members to provide further feedback on.


  • Join the conversation with Council's Community Engagement Network

    5 months ago
    Pic_of_cen

    Community engagement on ‘Tweed the Future is Ours’ has already started.

    Our Community Engagement Network is a team of Council staff who are passionate about having conversations and sharing information about the Tweed.

    The Community Engagement Network has already conducted a series of focus group sessions at Banora Point, Kingscliff and Murwillumbah to gain a sense of community knowledge of - and current satisfaction with - Council services and assets.

    Participants also discussed the ways they like to communicate and engage with Council, providing great feedback on the most effective ways to conduct the ‘Tweed The Future is Ours’ community... Continue reading

    Community engagement on ‘Tweed the Future is Ours’ has already started.

    Our Community Engagement Network is a team of Council staff who are passionate about having conversations and sharing information about the Tweed.

    The Community Engagement Network has already conducted a series of focus group sessions at Banora Point, Kingscliff and Murwillumbah to gain a sense of community knowledge of - and current satisfaction with - Council services and assets.

    Participants also discussed the ways they like to communicate and engage with Council, providing great feedback on the most effective ways to conduct the ‘Tweed The Future is Ours’ community engagement.

    “We want to continue to build relationships with the community, so the engagement will be conducted by Council staff from across the organisation, not consultants,” Council’s Director Corporate Services, Liz Collyer, said.

    “One of the strong messages which came through the focus groups is that people want us to come to where they are with Council information and that’s what we’ll be doing with ‘Tweed The Future is Ours’.

    “You’ll see us out and about at community events, markets and shopping centres over the next 18 months, so please come and say hello and have a chat.

    “We want to present to the community a clear, simple and understandable picture of the current state of Council’s infrastructure, services and financial position.

    “But don’t let that scare you off – we’ll be having a lot of fun too.”



  • Your Council - much more than roads, rates and rubbish

    5 months ago
    Moac

    These days, Councils provide much more than roads, rates and rubbish.

    Tweed Shire Council is involved in community services, environmental protection, providing recreational facilities, economic development and many other areas which have direct impact on our lives.

    However, many of these assets and services have evolved over time without any real consideration of the long-term implications on Council resources or alternative methods of delivering the service.

    Through the Tweed The Future is Ours process, Tweed Shire Council aims to become a more contemporary organisation that provides assets and services at the levels the community wants, that are financially sustainable.

    In... Continue reading

    These days, Councils provide much more than roads, rates and rubbish.

    Tweed Shire Council is involved in community services, environmental protection, providing recreational facilities, economic development and many other areas which have direct impact on our lives.

    However, many of these assets and services have evolved over time without any real consideration of the long-term implications on Council resources or alternative methods of delivering the service.

    Through the Tweed The Future is Ours process, Tweed Shire Council aims to become a more contemporary organisation that provides assets and services at the levels the community wants, that are financially sustainable.

    In phase one of the process, Council has undertaken a thorough internal review to come to an agreed position and understanding of the assets we control and the services we currently provide.

    This information will form the basis of a comprehensive program of community engagement which will provide Council an understanding of the level of community satisfaction with Council services and assets as well as clear direction and service priorities for the future.



  • Services Council provides

    5 months ago
    Cemet

    Phase one of the Tweed the Future is Ours process has been about assessing the state of play in terms of the assets and services Council is responsible for.

    The next phase involves taking that information to the community

    Council has identified more than 50 services that are broken down into four streams.

    We’ve grouped our services into four streams:

    · People places and moving around – who we are and how we live

    · Leaving a legacy – looking out for future generations

    · Making decisions with you – we’re in this together

    · Behind the scenes – providing... Continue reading

    Phase one of the Tweed the Future is Ours process has been about assessing the state of play in terms of the assets and services Council is responsible for.

    The next phase involves taking that information to the community

    Council has identified more than 50 services that are broken down into four streams.

    We’ve grouped our services into four streams:

    · People places and moving around – who we are and how we live

    · Leaving a legacy – looking out for future generations

    · Making decisions with you – we’re in this together

    · Behind the scenes – providing support to make it happen


    “Through our Community Engagement Network and our Service Planning survey, Council is having important conversations with our communities about the level of services and infrastructure ratepayers and residents prefer,” Council’s Director Corporate Services, Liz Collyer, said.

    “It’s a conversation we haven’t had to date and it is crucial in determining what services the community would prefer Council to deliver and to what levels.

    “When it comes to Council’s built assets and infrastructure an example could be while many of us would love to drive on seamless smooth surfaces on all our roads, we have to able to afford them, so there will also be financial implications to consider.

    "We will be providing a number of scenarios relating to our assets for the community to have a look at and consider within budget constraints.

    “We really want to hear what residents think and make sure we’re planning the right future for everyone in the Tweed,” Ms Collyer said.


  • Assets Council controls

    4 months ago
    Les_burger_field
    Your Council is a $200 million business with some 700 employees, managing more than $3 billion in assets. Here are some examples of the assets Council looks after:

    Road network:

    ·1079km of sealed roads

    ·164km of unsealed roads

    ·210km of footpaths

    ·790km of kerb and gutters

    ·208 concrete bridges

    Water and wastewater:

    · Clarrie Hall Dam, capacity 15,000 mL

    ·Bray Park (640 mL) and Tyalgum Weir (10 mL)

    ·3 water and 8 wastewater treatment plants

    ·28 water and 190 wastewater pump stations

    ·43 reservoirs and 706km of water mains

    Infrastructure for... Continue reading

    Your Council is a $200 million business with some 700 employees, managing more than $3 billion in assets. Here are some examples of the assets Council looks after:

    Road network:

    · 1079km of sealed roads

    · 164km of unsealed roads

    · 210km of footpaths

    · 790km of kerb and gutters

    · 208 concrete bridges

    Water and wastewater:

    · Clarrie Hall Dam, capacity 15,000 mL

    · Bray Park (640 mL) and Tyalgum Weir (10 mL)

    · 3 water and 8 wastewater treatment plants

    · 28 water and 190 wastewater pump stations

    · 43 reservoirs and 706km of water mains

    Infrastructure for flood protection:

    · 376km of drainage

    · 10.4km of levee banks

    · 400 flood gates

    Recreational and other assets:

    · 378 parks

    · 37 sports fields

    · 82 playgrounds

    · 78 picnic areas with barbecues within 39 Council Parks

    · 3 aquatic facilities as the Tweed Regional Aquatic Centres

    Public toilets and amenity blocks:

    · 11 cemeteries

    · A public plant nursery

    · Community buildings:

    · 33 community buildings

    · 3 community centres

    · 3 libraries

    · 2 civic centres

    · Regional museum and regional art gallery


  • Room for improvement

    5 months ago
    Dozer

    While Tweed Shire Council has demonstrated through the Fit for the Future process that it is in a good position, there is always room for improvement.

    Asset management is a particular area of focus, according to Council’s Manager Financial Services, Michael Chorlton.

    “When you own a car, you know you need to do maintenance from time to time to ensure the vehicle remains roadworthy, safe and comfortable,” Mr Chorlton said.

    “If you don’t set aside enough money for maintenance, you run the risk of the car breaking down or costing you more to fix in the longer term.

    “Council needs... Continue reading

    While Tweed Shire Council has demonstrated through the Fit for the Future process that it is in a good position, there is always room for improvement.

    Asset management is a particular area of focus, according to Council’s Manager Financial Services, Michael Chorlton.

    “When you own a car, you know you need to do maintenance from time to time to ensure the vehicle remains roadworthy, safe and comfortable,” Mr Chorlton said.

    “If you don’t set aside enough money for maintenance, you run the risk of the car breaking down or costing you more to fix in the longer term.

    “Council needs to consider similar issues for Council’s assets.

    “For example, how much do we need to spend each year to ensure a public swimming pool is maintained at a level which is safe and meets community expectations? At what point should our planning indicate that we renew the asset or replace it?

    “Part of this process is increasing community understanding of Council assets so residents are interested and can make informed choices.

    “We want to know if the assets are adequately delivering the services the community wants."

    Survey linkXXXXXXXXXXXXXX



  • What is the Community Strategic Plan (CSP)?

    4 months ago
    Img_6175

    The Community Strategic Plan essentially addresses four key questions for the community:

    • Where are we now?
    • Where do we want to be in ten years’ time?
    • How will we get there?
    • How will we know when we have arrived?

    The Community Strategic Plan represents the highest level of strategic planning undertaken by a local council. All other plans developed by the council as part of the Integrated Planning and Reporting framework must reflect and support the implementation of the Community Strategic Plan.

    The Community Strategic Plan should identify the main priorities and aspirations of the community,... Continue reading

    The Community Strategic Plan essentially addresses four key questions for the community:

    • Where are we now?
    • Where do we want to be in ten years’ time?
    • How will we get there?
    • How will we know when we have arrived?

    The Community Strategic Plan represents the highest level of strategic planning undertaken by a local council. All other plans developed by the council as part of the Integrated Planning and Reporting framework must reflect and support the implementation of the Community Strategic Plan.

    The Community Strategic Plan should identify the main priorities and aspirations of the community, providing a clear set of strategies to achieve this vision of the future. Building the Community Strategic Plan takes time and must involve a whole-of-community engagement process.

    It is important to note that while the council is the custodian of the Community Strategic Plan, it may not be responsible for the delivery of all of the activities the Plan identifies. It is important that the Community Strategic Plan identifies who is responsible for its implementation, including other partners such as State agencies, non-government organisations, business partners and community groups.

    The Community Strategic Plan must be based on the social justice principles of access, equity, participation and rights. It should also address the quadruple bottom line (social, environmental, economic and civic leadership) issues. It is recommended that a council uses a multi-disciplinary team to manage and implement the integrated planning process.

    At the end of each council term a report is prepared by the council to its community which examines what progress has been made towards the achievement of outcomes identified in the Community Strategic Plan.