Scenic Landscape Strategy

Council is producing a Scenic Landscape Strategy to identify and protect the Tweed's highly valued and important landscapes.

Tweed Shire's landscapes tell a rich and complex story of the region's evolution, its volcanic history, ecology, cultural and economic diversity.

Those landscapes include the southern hemisphere’s largest extinct shield volcano, five World Heritage-listed National Parks containing ancient Gondwana rainforests and dramatic mountain ranges and 37km of white sandy beaches and rocky headlands.

Nestled between them are 12 quaint rural villages, coastal creeks, mangrove estuaries, the Tweed River and its vast rich alluvial floodplain, covered by sugar cane.

This diversity of landscape characteristics makes the Tweed Valley a popular tourist destination, as well as an increasingly sought after place to live and work.

The Scenic Landscape Strategy will identify the landscapes' scenic values and implement measures to manage and protect them, particularly in the context of vulnerability to development pressure.

Council is producing a Scenic Landscape Strategy to identify and protect the Tweed's highly valued and important landscapes.

Tweed Shire's landscapes tell a rich and complex story of the region's evolution, its volcanic history, ecology, cultural and economic diversity.

Those landscapes include the southern hemisphere’s largest extinct shield volcano, five World Heritage-listed National Parks containing ancient Gondwana rainforests and dramatic mountain ranges and 37km of white sandy beaches and rocky headlands.

Nestled between them are 12 quaint rural villages, coastal creeks, mangrove estuaries, the Tweed River and its vast rich alluvial floodplain, covered by sugar cane.

This diversity of landscape characteristics makes the Tweed Valley a popular tourist destination, as well as an increasingly sought after place to live and work.

The Scenic Landscape Strategy will identify the landscapes' scenic values and implement measures to manage and protect them, particularly in the context of vulnerability to development pressure.

  • The little things

    11 months ago

    The Scenic Landscape Strategy aims to go beyond the iconic attractions - Wollumbin / Mount Warning, the Tweed River and the stretches of white beaches - and shine a spotlight on the lesser-known attractions.

    Residents and visitors are invited to help identify the smaller landscapes that resonate at a personal or community level.

    It would be a tough job to find someone who does not agree that Wollumbin / Mount Warning, framed by the panoramic caldera rim, is an extraordinary and monumental sight.

    Who out there can dispute that the mighty Tweed River, meandering through its vast alluvial floodplain, sets... Continue reading

    The Scenic Landscape Strategy aims to go beyond the iconic attractions - Wollumbin / Mount Warning, the Tweed River and the stretches of white beaches - and shine a spotlight on the lesser-known attractions.

    Residents and visitors are invited to help identify the smaller landscapes that resonate at a personal or community level.

    It would be a tough job to find someone who does not agree that Wollumbin / Mount Warning, framed by the panoramic caldera rim, is an extraordinary and monumental sight.

    Who out there can dispute that the mighty Tweed River, meandering through its vast alluvial floodplain, sets a magnificent scene?

    And the Tweed’s 23 kilometres of white sandy beaches and undeveloped coastline stretching as far as the eye can see – there’s no doubt the wind in your ear whispers of times long ago.

    As well as developing a system of protection for those iconic landscapes, a key objective of the Scenic Landscape Strategy is to recognise and give value to landscapes within the Tweed that are not necessarily dramatic on a physical scale, yet resonate just as profoundly with the community on a personal level.

    Sometimes the little things are equally important, and treasured by the community that live here and those who pass through.

    That’s why Council is calling for the community to share your photos and narratives about the landscapes, places and settings that are special to you and that make the Tweed your home, or one of your favourite places to visit. We need help discovering the landscapes that are the backdrop for the stories.

    Whether it’s that dusty country road on the school bus route, or the mangrove beach where the old men gather to throw a line in….tell us what the landscapes of the Tweed mean to you.


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  • The strategy's objectives

    12 months ago

    The Scenic Landscape Strategy will be designed to:

    • Identify and map distinct landscapes in the Tweed
    • Assess the character and scenic quality of these landscapes based on methodology established by the Comprehensive Coastal Management Visual Management System (2004), and building on past landscape character evaluations
    • Identify highly valued and iconic views, viewing locations and viewing experiences throughout Tweed Shire
    • Understand the qualitative elements of views that underpin why these are important to residents and visitors
    • Understand how they might be affected by change and identify landscapes most sensitive to modification
    • Develop strategies, design guidelines and controls to protect and/or enhance... Continue reading

    The Scenic Landscape Strategy will be designed to:

    • Identify and map distinct landscapes in the Tweed
    • Assess the character and scenic quality of these landscapes based on methodology established by the Comprehensive Coastal Management Visual Management System (2004), and building on past landscape character evaluations
    • Identify highly valued and iconic views, viewing locations and viewing experiences throughout Tweed Shire
    • Understand the qualitative elements of views that underpin why these are important to residents and visitors
    • Understand how they might be affected by change and identify landscapes most sensitive to modification
    • Develop strategies, design guidelines and controls to protect and/or enhance scenic amenity, through well informed decisions on conservation, development and management.

  • An awakening to the value of scenic landscapes

    12 months ago
    Tedc 074


    The value of the region’s scenic amenity was recognised by Council in 1995 when it commissioned Catherine Brouwer Architects to prepare the ‘Tweed Scenic Landscape Evaluation’.

    That was a first step towards identifying the unique nature of these landscapes and ensuring their protection for future generations.

    It was a pioneering document at the time, presenting a wealth of valuable information and highlighting the importance of the Tweed's scenic landscapes.

    However, it was not easily translated into practical application through local land use planning processes and is now outdated.

    In 2004, the former NSW Department of Planning developed a Visual Management... Continue reading


    The value of the region’s scenic amenity was recognised by Council in 1995 when it commissioned Catherine Brouwer Architects to prepare the ‘Tweed Scenic Landscape Evaluation’.

    That was a first step towards identifying the unique nature of these landscapes and ensuring their protection for future generations.

    It was a pioneering document at the time, presenting a wealth of valuable information and highlighting the importance of the Tweed's scenic landscapes.

    However, it was not easily translated into practical application through local land use planning processes and is now outdated.

    In 2004, the former NSW Department of Planning developed a Visual Management System (VMS) for the NSW coast, as part of its Comprehensive Coastal Assessment initiative.

    The VMS sought to establish a methodology to characterise and assess the visual resources of the NSW coast, to help protect and effectively manage of scenic amenity. The State-wide document concluded with a pilot study of Tweed Shire’s coastal zone to demonstrate how the assessment methodology could be applied.


  • Caldera a celebrated 'Green Cauldron'

    12 months ago
    Tedc 091


    In 2008, Tourism Australia officially recognised the ‘Green Cauldron’ (referring to the Wollumbin / Mt Warning Caldera) as one of nine National Iconic Landscapes.

    This placed international focus on the region, with the Tweed at its heart, not just as a tourist destination but also a sample of national scenic and biodiversity importance.

    Tweed Shire Council acknowledges the relevance of previous projects, and the significance of the National Iconic Landscape recognition.

    Council is committed to prepare a comprehensive Scenic Landscape Strategy to consolidate past work and assist in protecting the Tweed’s distinctive and iconic scenic qualities into the future.



    In 2008, Tourism Australia officially recognised the ‘Green Cauldron’ (referring to the Wollumbin / Mt Warning Caldera) as one of nine National Iconic Landscapes.

    This placed international focus on the region, with the Tweed at its heart, not just as a tourist destination but also a sample of national scenic and biodiversity importance.

    Tweed Shire Council acknowledges the relevance of previous projects, and the significance of the National Iconic Landscape recognition.

    Council is committed to prepare a comprehensive Scenic Landscape Strategy to consolidate past work and assist in protecting the Tweed’s distinctive and iconic scenic qualities into the future.


  • Why protect scenic quality?

    12 months ago
    Tedc panoramic 022


    The remarkable and unique scenic qualities of the Tweed, including expanses of World Heritage-listed National Parks, are recognised and valued at an international level.

    They are highly valued by the Tweed's permanent residents but are also important to people who are visiting the area, whether as tourists or as regular visitors for work or recreation.

    Like many Australian coastal regions, there is ongoing pressure for new areas to be developed and existing developed areas to be changed.

    Council recognises that without proper management of our scenic landscape assets, their inherent and perceived values are at risk of being... Continue reading


    The remarkable and unique scenic qualities of the Tweed, including expanses of World Heritage-listed National Parks, are recognised and valued at an international level.

    They are highly valued by the Tweed's permanent residents but are also important to people who are visiting the area, whether as tourists or as regular visitors for work or recreation.

    Like many Australian coastal regions, there is ongoing pressure for new areas to be developed and existing developed areas to be changed.

    Council recognises that without proper management of our scenic landscape assets, their inherent and perceived values are at risk of being diminished or lost.

    It is therefore essential to identify highly valued and important landscapes, understand their scenic value and implement measures to manage and protect them, particularly in the context of vulnerability to development pressure.


  • Forums ask what's your scene?

    12 months ago

    Council’s Strategy Planning and Urban Design staff held a series of drop-in forums with a ‘What’s My Scene?’ theme at key locations across the Tweed during April.

    The forums drew on the experience and knowledge of local communities and visitors, who were invited to stop by and share their views on the landscape qualities they feel are central to the identity of the Tweed and its sense of place, as well as which vistas and vantage points are most important to them personally.

    The forums were held on:

    Council’s Strategy Planning and Urban Design staff held a series of drop-in forums with a ‘What’s My Scene?’ theme at key locations across the Tweed during April.

    The forums drew on the experience and knowledge of local communities and visitors, who were invited to stop by and share their views on the landscape qualities they feel are central to the identity of the Tweed and its sense of place, as well as which vistas and vantage points are most important to them personally.

    The forums were held on:

    • Mon 11 April 10am - 12pm Tumbulgum Community Hall
    • Mon 11 April 3.30pm - 6.30pm Tweed Heads Civic Centre
    • South Sea Islander Room
    • Tue 12 April 2.30pm - 6pm Pottsville Community Centre Reef Room
    • Wed 13 April 10am - 12.30pm Tyalgum Community Hall
    • Wed 13 April 2pm - 4pm Uki Community Hall